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ought that the r■eadiest method of procuring fixed air, and■ in sufficient purity, would be to he●at pounded lime-s

NEWS

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tone in a gun● barrel, “making it pass through the stem o■f a tobacco pipe or a glass tube carefully lute■d to the orifice of it.” “In thi■s manner I found that air is produced in gr●eat plenty; but, upon examining it, I found t●o my great surprise that little m■ore

expe■
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than one half of it was fixed air, capab●le of being absorbed by water; and t■hat the rest was inflammable, sometimes v■ery weakly, but sometimes pretty hig■hly so.” He surmised that■ this “air” must come from the iron, and yet,■ he noted, it differed from the or●dinary

riment
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inflammable air from iron by the r●emarkable blue colour of its flame, a■nd he concludes that “this inflammable ●principle may come from some remains of the an■imals from which it is thought that ■all calcareous matter proceeds.” Priestley, ●we now know, had incidentall●y co

s he s

OUT TEAM

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nverted some of the fixed● air into the only other oxide of c●ar

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bon, but he failed to appreciate the signi●ficance of his observati

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on, and● the credit of the discovery o●f carbon monoxide bel

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ongs to Cruiks■hank. In his next paper on “Ai●r in w

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hich Candles have burn

ed,” Priestle●y

made a discovery of the

very highest imp